Wednesday, September 22, 2010

From Kovel's Komments

Vintage Jewelry: A Better Investment than Gold?

"Estate" (pre-owned) and vintage jewelry is selling at better-than-ever prices. Dealers say buyers find it a good "hard asset" investment since gold has become so expensive and stocks and bonds so uncertain. Buyers also are afraid that new tax laws may regulate trading gold coins and bullion. (In 1933 President Franklin Roosevelt called in gold coins, bullion, and even gold certificates for a set price. The law did not have the result expected. Citizens with large amounts of gold transferred it to other countries.) The best investment jewelry has large precious stones, exhibits fine workmanship and is marked by a well-known firm like Cartier. Take a good look at any inherited jewelry. It could be more valuable than you think.

See our selection of vintage jewelry at: Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"To take from one, because it is thought his own industry and that of his fathers has acquired too much, in order to spare to others, who, or whose fathers, have not exercised equal industry and skill, is to violate arbitrarily the first principle of association, the guarantee to everyone the free exercise of his industry and the fruits acquired by it." --Thomas Jefferson

From Kovel's Komments

Antique Treasure Found in Cupboard!!

Check every cupboard when you're moving, selling a house, or settling an estate. Last year an English auctioneer was asked to look over items in a house whose owner was moving to a nursing home. In the kitchen cupboards, he found a pair of rare English porcelain sauceboats. They were slightly damaged and stained pieces of Chelsea porcelain marked with the early blue triangle mark used from 1745 to 1749. The pair sold for almost $79,000.

Don't have any rare sauceboats, but we do have some rare antique Wedgwood pieces. See them at Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"A State, I cheerfully admit, is the noblest work of Man: But Man, himself, free and honest, is, I speak as to this world, the noblest work of God…." --James Wilson, Chisholm v. Georgia, 1793

Saturday, September 18, 2010

Today In History: Constitution Day, Sept 17, 1787

The Enshrinement of Essential Liberty
By Mark Alexander · Thursday, September 16, 2010

"We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. ... Done...the seventeenth day of September, in the year of our LORD one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven." --George Washington and the delegates
The U.S. Constitution

On 17 September of every year, we observe Constitution Day in recognition of the anniversary of that venerable document's signing by our nation's Founders.

See entire article at: PatriotPost

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"A State, I cheerfully admit, is the noblest work of Man: But Man, himself, free and honest, is, I speak as to this world, the noblest work of God…." --James Wilson, Chisholm v. Georgia, 1793

Amateur Radio Hamfests Calendar For September

Here are some great Hamfests for you to visit! See you there!

Sept 4, 2010
Alamogordo Amateur Radio Club
Alamogordo, NM

Shelby Hamfest
Dallas, NC

Sept 11, 2010
41st Annual QWHA Hamfest
Mena, AR

Wyoming, MI

Greater Louisville Hamfest 50
Shepherdsville, KY

Rush City Radio Rendezvous
Rush City, MN

Windsor Hamfest
Windsor, ME

Sept 18, 2010
Alexander Hamfest and Swapmeet
Alexander, ME

Central Kentucky Amateur Radio Society
Richmond, KY

EmComm East Convention
Rochester, NY

Gadsden Amateur Radio Club
Attalla, AL

Paulding Amateur Radio Club
Dallas, GA

Pierre Amateur Radio Club Annual Hamfest
Pierre, SD

Southwestern Division Convention
San Diego, CA

Sept 25, 2010
35th Annual Elmira Hamfest
Horseheads, NY

5th Annual Central Wisconsin SwapFest
Colby, WI

Greenfield Tailgate Hamfest
Greenfield, IN

New Orleans Hamfest
Harahan, LA

Radio Expo 2010
Belvidere, IL

Ten-Tec Homecoming Hamfest
Sevierville, TN

Titusville Tail-Gate
Titusville, FL

Washington State Convention
Spokane Valley, WA

Fore more information on Amateur Radio, see our Squidoo Lens at: Hams & Hamfests
Penny N6HWB
Doug N3DAB
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"It is the duty of all men in society, publicly, and at stated seasons, to worship the SUPREME BEING, the great Creator and Preserver of the universe. And no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping GOD in the manner most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession or sentiments; provided he doth not disturb the public peace, or obstruct others in their religious worship." --John Adams, Thoughts on Government, 1776

Thursday, September 16, 2010

Today in History

September 16, 1620

Mayflower Departs England

On this day in 1620, The Mayflower sails from Plymouth, England, bound for the New World with 102 passengers.

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned – this is the sum of good government."
-Thomas Jefferson

Saturday, September 11, 2010

In Memory of 9/11

In Memory: 9/11
by: Roger Stockton, Executive Treasurer
Western Representation PAC

On September 11th 2001, our lives and our nation changed forever. By this time on that day, 2997 innocent people had lost their lives from the actions of 19 terrorists. This is a day to remember those people and the nearly 6300 others who were injured. We must also acknowledge the sacrifice of over 6000 coalition troops, 5696 of which were American soldiers, who have died to protect our freedom in Iraq and Afghanistan along with so many more injured. We owe these brave men and women everything.

The events of 9/11 remind us of just how fragile and precious life is. It also serves as a reminder of the fragility of the freedoms we take for granted. It is difficult for most Americans to understand the culture of evil prevalent in the dark hearts of terrorists who place no value on innocent lives. We must, however, understand that this evil exists, leaving us the choice to fight or surrender to the inevitability of another attack.

Most of us remember exactly where we were and what we were doing the moment we saw the first news reports on the attack. I was in the middle of my 48 hour firefighter shift. Sometime around 5:30am, PST, a fellow firefighter knocked on the door of my room shouting for me to come see what was happening. News reporters were scrambling to build a story of what happened as the first tower burned. The horrific feeling inside me as the second plane hit the adjoining tower is still burned into my memory. America was under attack.

There was no context to place the horrific events we witnessed that day. When the first tower collapsed, I knew that hundreds of firefighters and emergency workers were in the process of making their way up the stairways in an attempt to save those trapped above the flames. As the buildings crumbled, I knew in that instant that those they hoped to save had perished along with those who were trying to save them.

For a brief time following the attack, America came together in a way I have not seen in my life. The acts of bravery and kindness freely given by so many broke though political and social divides. We were a nation under attack and suddenly helping each other came easy. Sadly, this bond has faded as we move further away from the attack. Today, let us remember how important our neighbors and communities became that day.

Let us also remember these events in November when we have a chance to remove the apologists and those politicians who forget that America is a sovereign nation, not a socialist regime. As voters, it is up to us to remind our elected officials just who they work for and that they can and will be replaced if they ever forget.

May we all take a moment of silence this day to remember the lives lost and the sacrifice of those placing themselves in harm’s way to make sure it does not happen again.

May God bless you and may God bless the United States of America.

Roger Stockton, Executive Treasurer
Western Representation PAC

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever." --Thomas Jefferson, Notes on the State of Virginia, Query 18, 1781

Thursday, September 02, 2010

All About Wedgwood, Part VIII, Author Unknown

While less remarkable than the basalt or the jasper, the variegated ware manufactured by Wedgwood & Bentley is not without interest for the collector. Agate effects were produced by differentcolored clays, and cream-colored earthenware was colored on the surface and glazed to represent porphyry, granite, Egyptian pebble, etc.

A number of vases and bulb and flower-pots were made in these effects and in terra-cotta, likewise a few lamps and candelabra. A white porcelain biscuit, with smooth and wax-like surface, was also made, but only a few pieces of it are in existence. Some enameled ware was also turned out, but this is neither as distinctive nor as beautiful as the painted basalt.

The subject of cameos, medallions, etc., deserves a paragraph to itself. Some of Wedgwood's most decorative and most minutely perfect work was done in this class of pottery. At first these were in cream colored relief, with the ground stained. Then medallions, miniature portraits, intaglios, medals, etc., were made in black basalt. A few of these were flat, with a Classic figure painted in encaustic, but most of them were in black bas-relief. The invention of the jasper body enabled Wedgwood to produce white cameo reliefs on a colored ground in beautiful combinations. The relief was molded separately and so carefully applied that these cameos are often flawless under a magnify inb glass. Classic figures were used, and also portraits of royalties and other personages. There were several classes of these portrait cameos, some in basalt and others in jasper-chiefly blue and white. Medallion portraits were often set in silver and ranged from ring size to three inches in diameter. The commonest size was 2 x 1 1/4 inches, in oval form. The Classic medallions were also made in small sizes for jewels, and in larger sizes for framing or for mounting on furniture or mantels. Plaques were made for this purpose in sizes ranging from 9 x 6 inches to 27 1/2, x 81/2 inches.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Pictured above: Wedgwood Egyptian Medallion. We have several pieces of vintage Wedgwood Jewelry in our Mall store at: Wedgwood Egyptian Medallion.

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"Some talked, some wrote, and some fought to promote and establish it, but you and Mr. Jefferson thought for us all. I never take a retrospect of the years 1775 and 1776 without associating your opinions and speeches and conversations with all the great political, moral, and intellectual achievements of the Congress of those memorable years." --Benjamin Rush, to John Adams, 1812

August/September Sale At Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Beginning August 15, 2010 and running through September 15, 2010, all of our catalogue items will be on sale at 15% off listed price. Get your bargains beginning August 15th!!

Pictured here: Wooden Sailor Bank available at our store.

Penny and Doug
Penny's Antiques & Wedgwood Pantry

Quote of the Day:
"The state governments have a full superintendence and control over the immense mass of local interests of their respective states, which connect themselves with the feelings, the affections, the municipal institutions, and the internal arrangements of the whole population. They possess, too, the immediate administration of justice in all cases, civil and criminal, which concern the property, personal rights, and peaceful pursuits of their own citizens." --Joseph Story, Commentaries on the Constitution, 1833